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Marine Top Predators as Climate and Ecosystem Sentinels published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

A recent review from our group at ERD highlights the ability for highly mobile predators to serve a role as ecosystem sentinels, by integrating the ocean processes around them, and telling us something we would not otherwise know about the oceanic ecosystems. In an ideal world, we’d have fine scale measurements of the ecosystem components and thresholds that result in change, but top predators respond in multiple scales, from changes in breeding success, movement patterns, to diet analyses we can understand more about ocean ecosystems and when changes are likely to occur. We hope this manuscript will both further the discussion of the roles of top predators in the global ocean observing system, but also as sentinels for rapid response, when ecosystem changes are likely to occur, and when adaptive management will be most needed.

E.L. Hazen, B. Abrahms, S. Brodie, G. Carroll, M. Jacox, M.S. Savoca, K.L. Scales, W.J. Sydeman, and S.J. Bograd, 2019Marine Top Predators as Climate and Ecosystem Sentinels. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. DOI: 10.1002/fee.2125 PDF

Climate variability and change can result in ecosystem response via trophic pathways. Trophic linkages (gray and colored arrows) are represented in a generic pelagic food web. Solid colored lines represent a direct relationship between a sentinel via the metric measured and an ecosystem component; dashed colored lines represent the capacity of an organism to function as a leading sentinel, which can be used to predict a future ecosystem response; and dotted colored arrows represent the ecosystem link that is heralded by a leading sentinel.

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  2. New publication from Dr. Steph Brodie on “Trade-offs in covariate selection for species distribution models: a methodological comparison” in Ecography Leave a reply
  3. New publication in Global Ecology and Biogeography by Dr. Gemma Carroll titled “A review of methods for quantifying spatial predator–prey overlap” Leave a reply
  4. New publication on “Dynamic ensemble models to predict distributions and anthropogenic risk exposure for highly mobile species” by Dr. Briana Abrahms in Diversity and Distributions Leave a reply
  5. New publication by Dr. Sara Maxwell on “Seasonal spatial segregation in blue sharks (Prionace glauca) by sex and size class in the Northeast Pacific Ocean” Leave a reply
  6. Climate resiliency in fisheries management in ICES J of Marine Science Leave a reply
  7. New research in TREE “Translating Marine Animal Tracking Data into Conservation Policy and Management” Leave a reply
  8. New publication in Science Advances led by Tim White at Stanford Leave a reply
  9. Abrahms et al. publish in PNAS on Memory and resource tracking drive blue whale migrations Leave a reply